ecology-7

Marine ecosystem biomes -  Load the URLs  below:

Name __________________________ Date _____________  Period _______

 

3 parts:   Shorelines - http://www.mbgnet.net/salt/sandy/index.htm

     Temperate Oceans - http://www.mbgnet.net/salt/oceans/index.htm

     Tropical Oceans - http://www.mbgnet.net/salt/coral/index.htm


In each of the above URL links you will be reading, viewing, and taking notes on each of the above marine biomes.   Follow the directions below:

-Starting with the tropical ocean link (the one at the bottom because this goes along with the coral reef clips that we were viewing) read, view links, and take notes on each major heading to the left of the site pages.  In each area use the sub headings for guides.   Keep notes brief but detailed enough for discussion.  

Note:   This is A LOT of work.   We will be looking at pieces of each of these  areas both in-class and out of class.

 

ALL WORK IS TO BE DONE IN YOUR JOURNAL NOTEBOOK THAT MR. ANDREWS GAVE TO YOU.   

Other directions given to you in class:

 


Directions: Go to the Science Spot at http://sciencespot.net/ and click the Kid Zone graphic.  Click “Biology” and then choose “The Natural 

World.” Scroll down the page to find the links for biomes.   Visit the sites listed to find information to complete the chart. 

T. Trimpe 2002 

           

Tundra 

           

Coniferous 

Forest 

           

Deciduous 

Forest 

         

Desert 

           

Rain 

Forest 

         

Grassland 

Temperatures 

(highs/lows) Precipitation 

(total, patterns) Plants 

(3-5 examples) Animals 

(3-5 examples) Find three interesting facts about the biome. 

 

 



 

     Name ________________________ 

 

Go to http://sciencespot.net/ and click the Kid Zone logo. Click the link forClassification of Life to 

find the sites for this assignment. 

 

 

1.  What does the word “species” mean in Latin?  ____________________ 

2.  Who first proposed a system for classifying organisms? ____________________ 

3.  What two terms are used for an organism’s binomial name? _______________ and _____________  

 

 

1. What type of diagram do scientists use to show how species are related? ______________________ 

2. Explore the groups shown on the cladogram to answer these questions.  

   (1) What percentage of the world’s organisms are classified in each group? 

 Bacteria - _____ Prototists - _____ Green Plants - _____    Fungi - _____ 

   (2) Which animal group makes up the largest percentage of the world’s organisms? ______________ 

   (3) What are tetrapods? _____________________________________________________________ 

   (4) What protein do all animals have in common? ________________________________________ 

   (5) What structure do eukaryotes have in their cells? ____________________ 

   (6) Into what group would humans be classified? ____________________ 

 

 

Read the information on the page and then click the link for “Diversity of Life on Earth.”  Classify 

each organism into the correct kingdom and then write each one on a blank below. 

 

 True Bacteria - __________________    

 Archaea - ____________________ 

Fungi - _____________________ 

 Protists- ____________________ 

Plants - _____________________ and _____________________ 

Animals - ____________________, ____________________, and ____________________ 

       

T. Trimpe 2005       http://sciencespot.net/ 

 

1. What is the name given to animals with a backbone? _________________________ 

2. Click the Golden Eagle to start the online activity. Complete the following statements as you work 

through each section. 

 

All birds have ____________________________________________________________ 

Amphibians are___________________________________________________________ 

Mammals are ____________________________________________________________ 

All fish have _____________________________________________________________ 

All reptiles are ___________________________________________________________ 

 

 

1. What phrase is given to help you remember the classification categories? 

 

 

2. Classify each organism and complete the chart. 

Category Bear Orchid Sea Cucumber 

Kingdom    

Phylum    

Class    

Order    

Family    

Genus    

Species    

  

 

 

To play the game, click on all of the organisms that match the category listed at the top. When you 

think you have all of them, click to GO button to check your answers. Record your scores for each 

round in the space below. 

 

Category - _____________________________________ Points Earned = __________ 

Category - _____________________________________ Points Earned = __________ 

Category - _____________________________________ Points Earned = __________ 

                         Final Score = __________ 

 

 


The Taiga biome-  Load the URL below:   This goes with the Coniferous biome film.

http://www.mbgnet.net/sets/taiga/index.htm

  1. What about The Taiga? 

 

  1. Where is the Taiga located?

 

  1. What are the facts about the Taiga?

 

  1. What about Taiga plants?

 

  1. What grows here?

 

  1. What is life like on the Taiga?

 

c.    What are Conifers?

  1.   What about Needles?

 

  1.   What is fall like on the Taiga?

 

  1. What types of animals live in the Taiga? (list)

 

 


Deciduous forest biomes-  Load the URL below:

http://www.mbgnet.net/sets/temp/index.htm

  1. What about Deciduous Forests?

 

  1. What is a Temperate Deciduous Forest like?

 

  1. Where are they located?

 

  1. What causes the seasons?

 

  1. What colors are certain leaves in the fall? (list)

 

6.    What types of animals would we find in a Temperate Deciduous Forest? 

 


Desert biomes-  Load the URL below:

http://www.mbgnet.net/sets/desert/index.htm

  1. What is a Desert like?

 

  1. Types of Deserts?

 

 

  1. Deserts of the world?

 

 

  1. Desert plants?

 

 

 

  1. Desert animals? (list)

 

 

 


The story of   Wiley C. Coyote.

Load the URL:  http://www.sims.scienceinstruction.org/predprey/index.html

DO NOT CLICK ON THE SIMULATION UNTIL YOU HAVE DONE ALL OF THE FOLLOWING FIRST!

 

1.   What is the story that Wiley is telling us?   Give some examples.

2.  Predator/Prey interactions and invasive species.   What is this all about?

3.  The mathematical Predator/Prey model...What is this all about?   Give some examples.

4.  NASA CTs Role in complex modeling of invasive species.   What is this?

5.  What does Dr. Stohlgren do?   How will his work help with invasive species?

6.  What was concluded in this website?   What about the interactive?

7.   Now its time to play a little.   Go back to the introduction page and click on the SIMULATION ICON.

      Try out several different scenarios to see what happens to the predator and the prey.

 

Conclude your own findings from your simulation as to what happened when you did different things.

 

 

 

 

IN-CLASS ACTIVITY ON CAMOFLAGE:

 

load the following URL and read and listen about different types of camoglage that creatures use.   The highlight is the camo used by the Octopus.

 

http://animals.howstuffworks.com/animal-facts/animal-camouflage.htm

 

 

The second site I would like you to visit is the following:

 

http://chalk.richmond.edu/education/projects/webunits/adaptations/camou1.html

 

The above site is a camoflage game.  I think you will find it fun and informative.  Remember that camoflage is natures way of having creatures adapt to their environments.  This works for both predator and prey.

(Read the following essays and write a paragraph comment on each.   This will go along with some of the presentation items that Mr. Andrews will be going over in class.)

In the insect world things are often not what they seem, especially if you're a hungry predator. For 250 million years, insects have survived because they often appear to be something other than what they really are. Is it a bug, a twig, or a leaf? Is that butterfly the bitter-tasting one, or the delicious one that resembles it? An astonishing number of insects have evolved survival mechanisms that involve mimicry, camouflage, and disguise. 

In the case of orange-and-black butterflies, the viceroy has evolved a striking resemblance to the beautiful but foul-tasting monarch. The two are so similar that predators -- mainly birds -- avoid the viceroy, which is actually quite tasty but has benefited from the unpleasant reputation of the monarch. 

Sometimes the mimicry is not visual but auditory, as in some harmless flies that emit a sound just like the buzzing of an angry bee or wasp, keeping attackers away. Another, more unusual variety of camouflage is "aggressive mimicry." Some insect populations have evolved to mimic another species' look or behavior, which allows them to get close enough to an unsuspecting bug to attack and eat it. 

When an insect happens to blend in with its environment, it's called camouflage. Like mimicry, camouflage can be "protective," to avoid the attention of predators, or "aggressive," to allay suspicion while the predator attacks its prey. The praying mantis that has evolved a flat, triangular shape and coloring just like the leaves it sits on is extremely hard to detect. 

In camouflage, the shape and outline of the animal merge with the background so it's not recognizable. Similar to camouflage is disguise, in which the entire insect looks like a specific object, like a leaf or a twig that predators overlook. For these strategies to work, the animal must stay in a particular position for hours at a time, like moths that are active at night and rest by day, sitting motionless on the tree trunks into which they blend. 

Some creatures even change color to blend with new surroundings, like the crab spider that changes from white to yellow when it moves from daisies to goldenrod in the summer. With this in mind, it's certain that the forests and fields are alive with thousands of insects we never see -- but might, if we knew what to look for.

    close window

Background Essay: Evolution of Camouflage

In the insect world things are often not what they seem, especially if you're a hungry predator. For 250 million years, insects have survived because they often appear to be something other than what they really are. Is it a bug, a twig, or a leaf? Is that butterfly the bitter-tasting one, or the delicious one that resembles it? An astonishing number of insects have evolved survival mechanisms that involve mimicry, camouflage, and disguise. 

In the case of orange-and-black butterflies, the viceroy has evolved a striking resemblance to the beautiful but foul-tasting monarch. The two are so similar that predators -- mainly birds -- avoid the viceroy, which is actually quite tasty but has benefited from the unpleasant reputation of the monarch. 

Sometimes the mimicry is not visual but auditory, as in some harmless flies that emit a sound just like the buzzing of an angry bee or wasp, keeping attackers away. Another, more unusual variety of camouflage is "aggressive mimicry." Some insect populations have evolved to mimic another species' look or behavior, which allows them to get close enough to an unsuspecting bug to attack and eat it. 

When an insect happens to blend in with its environment, it's called camouflage. Like mimicry, camouflage can be "protective," to avoid the attention of predators, or "aggressive," to allay suspicion while the predator attacks its prey. The praying mantis that has evolved a flat, triangular shape and coloring just like the leaves it sits on is extremely hard to detect. 

In camouflage, the shape and outline of the animal merge with the background so it's not recognizable. Similar to camouflage is disguise, in which the entire insect looks like a specific object, like a leaf or a twig that predators overlook. For these strategies to work, the animal must stay in a particular position for hours at a time, like moths that are active at night and rest by day, sitting motionless on the tree trunks into which they blend. 

Some creatures even change color to blend with new surroundings, like the crab spider that changes from white to yellow when it moves from daisies to goldenrod in the summer. With this in mind, it's certain that the forests and fields are alive with thousands of insects we never see -- but might, if we knew what to look for.